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Can This App Really Reduce Food Waste?

Can This App Really Reduce Food Waste?

If it pains you to think about the amount of food that is wasted on a daily basis, there’s a new app that will probably pique your interest. The new app called PareUp is designed to reduce the amount of food wasted every day at grocery stores, bakeries and coffee shops.

Guardian Liberty Voice reports about the app designed by Margret Tung, Anuj Jhunjhunwala, and Jason Chen. PareUp is attempting to make a dent in reducing the reportedly $165 billion worth of food we waste every year. The app works by notifying users of discounted food at their local markets, coffee shops, and bakeries. They can then go to the stores to make purchases of food that will soon be thrown out like day old breads, leftovers, and foods that are fresh but will soon expire.

The app’s creators are still working on a version of PareUp to make it easier for users to drop off food donations at food banks and nonprofits in their area after being alerted to discounts. The app, which will debut in New York, is expected to be available at the Apple store by the end of summer.

What do you think of the new app that aims to reduce food waste?

Would you find an app like this helpful?
 

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  • basilandcatnip By basilandcatnip
    06.02.14  

    I hope it works. But in my city, most restaurants etc are not able to donate even when they want to participate due to health codes. Also restricts non profits as they can "warm" food items but can not cook or store foods, which would require another permit, cost & inspections. Seems like every time people want to do good, there's a road block (or a rule that channels the flow of $). Best of luck, I hope it works and takes off.

  • jemappel By jemappel
    06.02.14  

    This is great. Everything that saves food can help. A lot of food waste is consumer-driven. People won't buy imperfect-looking food and they won't buy food based on the date on the label...but a lot of the dates are not really "expiry" dates. People are working with food companies to change how they decide to put dates on food so consumers are not misled. There are 2 great movies, Dive! www.divethemovie.com and Just Eat It! http://ecowatch.com/2014/04/03/just-eat-it-documentary-food-waste/ about people 'saving' dumped food. In the latter movie, 2 people ate only discarded food for 6 months. They found so much high-quality food that friends "shopped" at their house during this time!! Another org in the NYC area is Rock and Wrap It Up! that collects unserved foods and can bring to homeless shelters, etc. As well the Bill Emmerson Good Samaritan Act protects orgs that donate food from liability http://www.foodtodonate.com/Fdcmain/LegalLiabilities.aspx

  • lbjones89 By lbjones89
    01.24.15  

    it wont work for people like me that dont have a smartphone but it sounds like a good idea; the stores wont lose money throwing out good food and the people who need can get to it

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