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Noelgopie


 
 
Does time out really work?
on Jul 12, 2013 (Read 566 times | Comments: 8)
How do you do to get your child to behave or punish your child for doing something wrong multiple times?
mariedmandi
mariedmandi


on Jul 15, 2013 Quote  »     Reply  »

I have 2 kiddos. For my oldest son to have a swat on the booty was WAY worse than having a time out! Now my youngest... times outs are the worst. he hates time outs... so that works as a punishment for him. Swats have no effect on him. The thing I've noticed is for timeouts to work, YOU HAVE TO BE DILIGENT!!! Make sure they stay put where you put them. So with all that being said,, I think it really depends on the child (and age):) Hope that helps!
nicolegray
nicolegray


on Feb 03, 2014 Quote  »     Reply  »

I have a four year old and a two year old! Both boys and neither time out or swats on the booty worked for my four year old! His doctor swears he has ADHD but I don't want to put him on meds until he's old enough to decide for himself anyway the only thing that seems to work with him is if I take things like TV or sweets things like that! I honestly think it depends on the child what punishment works!
nicolegray
nicolegray


on Feb 03, 2014 Quote  »     Reply  »

I have a four year old and a two year old! Both boys and neither time out or swats on the booty worked for my four year old! His doctor swears he has ADHD but I don't want to put him on meds until he's old enough to decide for himself anyway the only thing that seems to work with him is if I take things like TV or sweets things like that! I honestly think it depends on the child what punishment works!
HBRedbird
HBRedbird


on Feb 05, 2014 Quote  »     Reply  »

My two middle children do great with time outs. We call them resets. It is like they literally reset their brain. My youngest is only 14 months and hasn't been able to have anything other than redirect and stern "no" given. My oldest is turning 11 in a few weeks and she requires consequences that entail things being taken from her.
AllThatJazz
AllThatJazz


on Feb 05, 2014 Quote  »     Reply  »

I think different parenting works for different parents and kids. What works for one may not work for the other. I've never believed in the time out though. I redirect the child from what they should not be doing at early ages and when they get older I tell them why they should not be doing that behavior. Boys especially can be very "busy", not bad or naughty. They seem to want to know how things work and how they are put together and though it's very tiring they have to be watched constantly!
ToBeHeard
ToBeHeard


on Feb 08, 2014 Quote  »     Reply  »

I feel that time out really works, when the parent follows what they say they will do. If a child knows that the parent will not follow through with the time-out the child may be apt not to listen. Also, the time out should be constructive for both the parent and the child. As an example... "One more time and you'll go to your room for 15 minutes!" Nobody really benefits from this sort of time-out. I have found, "One more time and you'll get a 15 minutes time-out to read and focus, 15 minutes to reorganize your books or toys, 15 minutes to walk the dogs outside and take out the recycling." I find that these are healthy ways for redirection and it allows both of us to decompress and form an intelligent conversation after 15 minutes. The focus is off of self and onto an action item. These are my thoughts and opinions, based on what we do in my own home.
Fairymonkey
Fairymonkey


on Feb 08, 2014 Quote  »     Reply  »

I think time out can work out, as long as you implement it correctly and aren't using it 24/7 with your child and your child actually thinks it is a punishment (rather than going to their room and playing with toys). Sometimes a child needs to be alone to think, and to calm down and restart.
MotherEarth406
MotherEarth406


on Feb 01, 2018 Quote  »     Reply  »

I?m a firm believer in gentle parenting being a most effective method for optimal parenting. Since every child is different and responds to things differently I believe it?s important to treat our children as equally as possible. I know for our household (2 soon to be 3 children under 5) I have gauge the lesson based on what was done wrong and also their age. For example, if my daughters are fighting over a toy I will likely try to help them resolve the problem first and if that proves to be non effective I will usually just take that toy away for awhile . That way I?m teaching them how to resolve conflict instead of fuling the flame. If the issue can?t be resolved then I have to step in and resolve it for them. One thing in particular I always try to make a point of though is explaining why what they did was not okay . I always try to regrain from yelling or acting aggressive because those behaviors contradict teaching lessons . We shouldn?t aim to punish in my opinion.