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One Woman Refrains From Smiling For Forty Years To Avoid Wrinkles

One Woman Refrains From Smiling For Forty Years To Avoid Wrinkles

Botox and other anti-wrinkle treatments too invasive or expensive for you? One UK woman believes she has a simple and affordable option that’s worked wonders for her. Tess Christian is now 50 years old and admittedly fresh-faced, owing it all to a 40 year stint of never smiling or laughing. That’s right, Christian says that she completely gave up smiling when she was just 10 years old in order to reap the benefits of smoother and firmer skin.

The Daily Mail reports about Christian’s anti-wrinkle regime and whether or not something like this actually works. And if it does work, is having a more youthful appearance really worth a lifetime of keeping that “poker face”?

Christian believes not smiling for forty years was definitely worth it since she now enjoys looking much younger than friends her own age. She claims her personal strategy is “more natural than Botox” and hasn’t had a negative impact on her life.

She explains how not smiling or laughing has worked for her saying, “I don’t have wrinkles because I have trained myself to control my facial muscles. Everyone asks if I’ve had Botox, but I haven’t, and I know that it’s thanks to the fact I haven’t laughed or smiled since I was a teenager. My dedication has paid off, I don’t have a single line on my face.” She adds, “Yes, I am vain and want to remain youthful. My strategy is more natural than Botox and more effective than any expensive beauty cream or facial.”

This may sound a little extreme for many of us but Dermatologist Dr. Nick Lowe explains how Christian’s technique may really work. He says, “Wrinkles happen because of the constant creasing of smile and forehead lines by the muscles in your face, which fold the connective tissue under the skin. If you can train yourself to minimise your facial expressions, you won’t get as many lines. We know this because it is exactly how Botox works — by reducing muscle activity.” Dr. Lowe also admits that it is an odd way to limit wrinkles and not for everyone. He adds, “Not smiling is a DIY option, although I would have thought it difficult to keep up, not to mention boring for your partner and confusing for your children.”

Smiling may be bad for wrinkles, but isn’t it really good for our mental health? London-based psychologist Amanda Hills explains how smiling is very important to maintain happiness and mental health. She says, “When you smile you release endorphins, known as “happy hormones” that make you feel good,’ she explains. ‘Not only that, but the more you do it the happier you feel, because you are telling the neural pathways in your brain you are happy — even if you aren’t.” That’s why even faking a smile can make you feel better sometimes.

What do you think of this woman’s personal strategy to reduce the appearance of aging?

Would you ever give up smiling and laughing if it meant having no wrinkles?
 

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  • Kay3131 By Kay3131
    02.10.15  

    It is more than just "lines" which make us look older - in this photo it's easy to see that the fullness once in her upper cheek and once under her eyes - has gravitated south. That's why she does not look 'under 35' despite not having the visible face wrinkles that would match her neck bands. My opinion is that it is better to laugh & smile through life and if wrinkles bother you, go for the botox - but if she is happy, then good for her.

  • JustMissAsh By JustMissAsh
    02.10.15  

    I understand that people do not like wrinkles, but avoiding smiling is awful. Smiling is contagious and happy. A life without smiling would be hard and no fun. In my opinion, she'd probably look younger if she smiled more, or at all. Smiling and laughter keeps us youthful and connected to others. But hey, whatever makes her feel better about herself. Thays some definite self control and motivation she had there. I can't go an hour without smiling or laughing. I don't necessarily have wrinkles but have some fine lines but I wouldn't give up smiling for the lack of those.

  • Shay90 By Shay90
    02.13.15  

    I don't see how she did it. I think this is a little extreme. Smiling and laughing is good for your mental health. www.Facebook.com/parentingisgreat

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